Suicide prevention

We develop information resources to support people who are worried about their own suicide risk or the suicide risk of someone else.
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He oranga ngākau, He pikinga waiora.
Positive feelings in your heart will enhance your sense of self-worth.

Suicide is a major public health issue in New Zealand. We want to help you and other New Zealanders understand how we can work together as individuals, whānau, colleagues, neighbours and communities to prevent suicide and support each other to create lives worth living.

To us, that doesn’t mean no one ever goes through a hard time or finds it hard to keep going. It means that when those tough times hit we all have the skills and support we need to get through. That support should be culturally appropriate, recovery-focused, evidence-informed, compassionate and centered around you – your goals, your values, your life and your beliefs.
We want New Zealanders to know what puts people at risk of suicide, what warning signs we can all look out for, how to get help for ourselves or someone else and what we can do to prevent people from becoming suicidal. We want our families, whānau and community to feel empowered to care for their loved ones when they need support.

Most of all, we want you to know that suicide is preventable. If you’ve found this page because you’re struggling, we believe you will get better and there is a future for you that is brighter than you can see right now. Go here for immediate help, or here for other support options.

If you’re having suicidal thoughts, you’re not alone. You will get through. We have information, including ways to get support, that will help you here.

Helplines

The Mental Health Foundation works alongside a range of other suicide prevention initiatives as part of the New Zealand Suicide Prevention Strategy 2006–2016. We also have information on suicide loss.

Matua Rawiri Wharemate - kaumātua and kuia on suicide prevention

Matua Rawiri Wharemate (Ngātiwai, Ngāti Moerewa, Ngāpuhi) talks about supporting young people to achieve their potential, through building connection with whānau, culture, tikanga and matauranga, and developing resilience and self-worth. He shares an example of whānau working together with services to help a young person through suicidal distress.
This video is part of the series: He kōrero enei mo te kaupapa mate whakamomori o ngā kaumātua kuia - Voices of kaumātua and kuia on suicide and suicide prevention

Resources